Sorry Bamba Du Mali – Sorry Bamba Du Mali [SON8203]

One of the most pivotal figures in the history of Malian music is Sorry Bamba. His work spans five decades and his music bridges the gap between Mali’s cultural traditions and new the music which arose from the musical cross overs which occurred in Mali’s post-Colonial period. Bamba was born in 1938 in Mopti. This is dissected by both the Niger and Bani rivers and known for its rich cultural diversity. Bamba’s father was a distinguished veteran of Emperor Samory Toure’s military and a nobleman in Malian society; however, this meant young Sorry was forbidden to make music, as under the nation’s caste system, music was an art form reserved for the Griots. At the age of 10, Sorry’s parents died and in traumatic times that followed the young teen found solace in music. He first taught himself to play am African six-holed flute. As he progressed he began to absorbed the rich tapestry of music of his surroundings; traditional Malian music, highlife from Ghana, local accordion master Toumani Toure, European singers and musicians. In 1957 Sorry formed his first band, Group Goumbe, named after a popular Ivory Coast dance style. In 1960 Mali gained independence from France, Bamba and his group benefited from a new openness toward local music on the state-run radio network Radio Mali. Sorry then went on to form two award-winning, further collectives Bani Jazz and later the Kanaga Orchestra. They fused Latin jazz, Western R&B, Psychedelic and funk, and traditional Malian styles made them a favourite in Mali and beyond.

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Sorry Bamba Du Mali – Sorry Bamba Du Mali [SON8203]

Mukatsuku presents Kirk Degiorgio / As One / Butti 49 – Jazz Classics Volume 4 [MUKAT056]

In the late 1990’s label manager Nik Weston was working for Island Records and in particular the label imprint Island Blue set up by Ross Allen. It was here that he first heard the timeless jazz version masterpiece of Amalia from Kirk Degiorgio’s As One. The track featured on a promo CD but never made it to a commercial release for Island Blue and was later featured on the full length album release for San Francisco label Ubiquity Records a few years later in 2001. ‘Amalia’ is a sultry jazz classic featuring gorgeous keys from Jamie Odell aka Jimpster. As relevant today as it ever was when initially made and here presented as a single in it’s own right for the very first time. On the flipside another track that never made it to single in this version was the unique jazzual ‘Spiritual Rotations’ by Butti 49 from Norway. Nik had later worked with Butti 49 whilst working for Exceptional Records for the Habit album in 2004 but ‘Spiritual Rotations’ itself initially featured as an exclusively album only track for Future Sounds Of Jazz Volume 8 in 2001 for German label Compost.

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Mukatsuku presents Kirk Degiorgio / As One / Butti 49 – Jazz Classics Volume 4 [MUKAT056]

Örtmek – Örtmek 01 [ORTMEK01]

Three expansive edits of Turkish funk and psychedelia, each dubbed out through tape delays and spring reverbs, as well as carefully EQ-ed and mastered for an enhanced sonic experience. Side A kicks off with the low slung funk of ‘Ayçiçegi’, featuring an infectious bassline which weaves between subtle flashes of spring reverb, whispered vocals, each underpinned by pounding drums. Side B begins with ‘Biz Burdayiz’ , a relentless drum loop and singular vocal hit looped around and manipulated with tape delays, and the record closes with ‘Günesi Kesin’, a tense funk break which builds before reversing inside of itself.

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Örtmek – Örtmek 01 [ORTMEK01]